About Our Farm...

Village Acres Farm

Village Acres Farm has a mission of connecting people to their food, the earth and each other. We are committed to growing food and building relationships that are sustaining, restorative, and transformative for our customers, employees, and selves.

Celebrating over 30 years of farming, 20 years of Organic certification and 15 years of serving the community through a CSA model, Village Acres operates as a diversified system, integrating vegetables, berries and pastured livestock.

Village Acres offers on-farm pick-up of produce, eggs, and chicken for CSA members, as well as distribution to State College, Lewistown, Selinsgrove, and Harrisburg. We also serve breakfast the first Saturday of every month (April-November) and live music several evenings a year in our FoodShed.

Located just off Route 322 near Mifflintown - about 45 minutes from State College and Harrisburg - the 30 acre farm is centered in the village of Cuba Mills, nestled along the banks of the Lost Creek close to its confluence with the Juniata River.

 Read about our farm in Grid Magazine's Farmbook...

Blog/Farm Newsletters

Summer/Fall Week #14

Posted by Hannah :: Tuesday, September 2 :: 8:11am

IN THE SHARE THIS WEEK: 

Tues: Sungolds, Sweet Corn, Summer Squash, Onions, Carrots, Yellow Beans, Bell Peppers, Tomatoes, Garlic, Kale/Chard, Edamame Soybeans, Hot Peppers, Herbs 


UPCOMING EVENTS: 

Farm Breakfast Sept 6th (8-11am): Stop by for a farm-sourced nutrient-dense (and delicious) farm breakfast (1st Sat of every month, Apr.-Nov.). Proceeds benefit our Community Fund.

Blue Heron at Big TreeLive Music with Blue Heron Sept 6th (6pm-?): Join us in supporting a local treasure, Blue Heron. Many of you will remember the Christmas Eve tragic accident that claimed the life of locally loved musician Dave Kirkland. His life-partner Delphine, the other half of Blue Heron, is carrying on with the band and will be joined by other local musicians for a return to Village Acres. A not-to-be-missed performance of soulful blues and rock music! FoodShed grill will open at 6pm with music performance at 7pm. BYOB Family-friendly event.


FARM NOTES:

September has arrived and, with it, August weather! Our heat loving plants are benefitting from the heat they’ve been missing over the last few weeks. The peppers and tomatoes may just get a second wind after all!

As part of your share this week (outside the box), you will find edamame soybeans. We recommend eating them soon as the heat rushed them the last few days and they are yellower than we typically like. You will find them still on the stalk (we are calling these a u-pick item;-). While we love growing soybeans, and eating them, the task of picking them is quite labor intensive, so we are asking you to help. If you are unfamiliar with edamame, they are a green soybean. The inner beans are deliciously nutty when steamed. To prepare, we recommend boiling water (with salt added) while you remove the pods from the stems. Then, rinse the pods and add them to the boiling water, boiling until all the pods rise to the top (no more than 3-5 minutes). Strain and lightly salt. Eat by sucking on the pods and slipping the beans into your mouth. Delicious!

Thanks everyone who filled out our mid-season survey. If you haven’t had a chance, please take a few moments to complete the survey online at www.villageacresfarm.com/survey-summer-2014. We will close the survey this weekend and compile the results for you (and us).
Enjoy the bounty of your share of the harvest!

Hannah


RECIPE: 

Roasted Corn and Edamame Salad

SELF | May 2007 Shawn Edelman
Yield: Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

- 2 ears fresh corn, unhusked, or 1 1/4 cups cooked corn kernels
- 1/2 cup shelled edamame
- 1/4 cup chopped red onion
- 1/4 cup small-diced red bell pepper
- 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh cilantro
- 1 tablespoon light mayonnaise
- 1 tablespoon lemon juice
- 1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped or grated ginger
- 1/8 teaspoon salt
- 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preparation

Soak fresh corn in cold water about 30 minutes. Heat grill on high. Grill corn in husk, 10 to 15 minutes, turning once. Let cool. Remove husks. Cut corn from cob into a bowl; combine with remaining ingredients.

Cover and chill in refrigerator until ready to serve.

 

 

Summer/Fall Week #13 & Survey

Posted by Hannah :: Tuesday, August 26 :: 11:26am

IN THE SHARE THIS WEEK: 

Fri: Potatoes, Onions, Red Beets, Yellow Beans, Bell Peppers, Carmen, Yummy Peppers, Cucumbers, Sweet Corn, Tomatoes, Garlic, Lettuce, Hot Peppers and Herbs (Rosemary, Thyme, Parsley and Basil).

Tues: Potatoes, Onions, Red Beets, Yellow Beans, Bell Peppers, Carmen, Jimmy/Yummy Peppers, Summer Squash, Tomatoes, Garlic, Lettuce, Hot Peppers and Herbs (Rosemary, Thyme, Parsley and Basil).


UPCOMING EVENTS: 

Farm Breakfast Sept 6th (8-11am): Stop by for a farm-sourced nutrient-dense (and delicious) farm breakfast (1st Sat of every month, Apr.-Nov.). Proceeds benefit our Community Fund.

Blue Heron at Big TreeLive Music with Blue Heron Sept 6th (6pm-?): Join us in supporting a local treasure, Blue Heron. Many of you will remember the Christmas Eve tragic accident that claimed the life of locally loved musician Dave Kirkland. His life-partner Delphine, the other half of Blue Heron, is carrying on with the band and will be joined by other local musicians for a return to Village Acres. A not-to-be-missed performance of soulful blues and rock music! FoodShed grill will open at 6pm with music performance at 7pm. BYOB Family-friendly event.


FARM NOTES:

Wow! It’s been wet! wet! wet!

Typically, at this time of year, we are simply overrun with late summer crops like tomatoes and cucumbers; we can hardly keep up with the harvesting; and, we are taking daily advantage of late afternoon creek plunges.  Not this August!

It’s not just these crops that are being affected by the cool wet weather. Some of our root crops that we’d soon be harvesting, sharing and putting into storage for the winter are being hit just as hard. For example, we have one field of carrots that were planted in a low lying area that are a loss. Other plantings were put out later than what is ideal. Thankfully, we plant successive plantings and the next round should be OK. This is the life of a CSA farmer: “do one’s best to predict and then make do”. We are very fortunate to the have infrastructure and experience and help to make “making do” still translate to a decent harvest share for our members, but this model of “equal share in the harvest, regardless of the ups and downs” can leave a farmer fretting!

We are finally ready to send out our mid-season survey. Please take a few moments to complete the survey online at www.villageacresfarm.com/survey-summer-2014

Thanks and enjoy the sun!

Hannah


RECIPE: SQUASH & TOMATO GRATIN

Ingredients:

1/3 cup grated Parmesan
4 Tbsp. olive oil, divided
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 large tomato, sliced
2 large summer squash, thinly sliced
1 cup coarse fresh breadcrumbs

Preparation: Toss breadcrumbs with Parmesan and 2 Tbsp. oil; season with salt and pepper. Heat remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a medium ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Add tomato; cook, tossing occasionally, until juices are bubbling, about 4 minutes; season with salt and pepper. Top with squash and breadcrumb mixture. Bake at 350° until squash is tender and breadcrumbs are golden brown, 20–25 minutes.


 

Summer/Fall Week #12

Posted by Debra Brubaker :: Tuesday, August 19 :: 10:05am

IN THE SHARE THIS WEEK:

Tues: Green Beans, Sungolds, Carrots, Eggplant, Bell Peppers, Onions, Tomatoes, Summer Squash, Cucumbers (some from Plowshare Produce as they have a bumper crop that they are wanting to share) Hot Peppers, Chard, Fennel, Herbs

Fri: Green Beans, Kale, Lettuce Heads, Eggplant, Bell Peppers, Onions, Tomatoes, Summer Squash, Cucumbers (some from Plowshare Produce as they have a bumper crop that they are wanting to share) Hot Peppers, Chard, Fennel, Herbs

Farm Note:  It’s an odd August- Long sleeves to start the mornings, and no hum of fans. It sure makes for pleasant working conditions on a produce farm.  Luckily the tomatoes and peppers continue to ripen albeit at a slower rate.  Of course with the cool weather I worry that the greenhouse pepper plants, still loaded with green peppers, and the heat loving ginger and turmeric, which are growing so slowly, will want to linger in the greenhouse beyond my usual seeding date of winter greens in the greenhouses- which crop with take priority in the use of the space?? One of the biggest challenges of being a CSA farmer is timing things properly.  How do I make sure that there is a steady supply of produce over such a long season?  Well, we are fortunate to have an extensive schedule that has been developed over the 18 years that we have been running a CSA. As long as we are able to plant roughly according to that schedule (barring bad weather or pest pressure), we have found that we can generate a steady supply of vegetables.  So come September 1st when I’m supposed to be seeding spinach in the greenhouse, well…, some of those peppers may lose their spot, or perhaps in the time till then, I can figure out to build another frost protective spot elsewhere where the first greens will be planted to give those peppers a little more time.   Deb

Recipe: Roasted Eggplant and Sweet Pepper Dip

(Tested recommended by current member of CSA from shecookshecleans.net)

Ingredients:
1 large eggplant
2 red bell peppers, seeded
4 garlic cloves, whole, peeled
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil (to start with…)
1 teaspoon kosher salt; freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons tahini paste
1 teaspoon ground cumin
cayenne pepper, to taste
juice of one lemon
lots more good extra-virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 400F.
Cut the eggplant up into 1-inch square pieces. (Before cutting, I like to take off some of the skin in stripes around the eggplant. Up to you.) Cut the red bell peppers into 1 inch strips. Toss the eggplant, peppers, and garlic in a large bowl with olive oil, salt, and several grindings of pepper.Spread the vegetables on a parchment-lined baking sheet in a single layer. Roast for 35-45 minutes, tossing once during cooking, until the vegetables are soft and lightly browned. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly.Place the vegetables in a food processor; add the tahini, cumin, cayenne, lemon juice, and another glug (or two) of olive oil. Process in pulses until blended. Season to taste with salt and pepper. (Try to avoid over-processing or it will become paste-like in texture.)Drizzle with more olive oil on top, and serve warm or at room temperature.

UPCOMING EVENTS: Farm Breakfast Sept 6th (8-11am): Stop by for a farm-sourced nutrient-dense (and delicious) farm breakfast (1st Sat of every month, Apr.-Nov.). Proceeds benefit our Community Fund. Live Music with Blue Heron Sept 6th (6pm-?): Join us in supporting a local treasure, Blue Heron. A not-to-be-missed performance of soulful blues and rock music! FoodShed grill will open at 6pm with music performance at 7pm. BYOB Family-friendly event.

Read More >>

Mailing list sign-up